• The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

    CUT from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKXyJkfvkiQ&&

    published: 13 Nov 2015
  • Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

    How a currency crisis in Thailand led to a banking crisis in the 1990s Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/math-mechanics-of-thai-banking-crisis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/speculative-attack-on-a-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their ow...

    published: 14 May 2012
  • What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

    Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Asian Crisis” During 1997-98, many of the East Asian tiger economies suffered a severe financial and economic crisis. This had big consequences for the global financial markets, which had become increasingly exposed to the promise that Asia had seemed to offer. The crisis destroyed wealth on a massive scale and sent absolute poverty shooting up. In the banking system alone, corporate loans equivalent to around half of one year's GDP went bad - a destruction of savings on a scale more usually associated with a full-scale war. The precise cause of the crisis remains a matter of debate. Fingers have been pointed at the currency peg adopted by some countries, and a reduction of c...

    published: 25 Nov 2015
  • Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

    published: 28 Aug 2014
  • Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

    For IB Economics By Caro Bev and Judith Nav.

    published: 28 Apr 2013
  • How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

    Asian Values Devalued - Is Malaysia's campaign for democracy going backwards? Subscribe to Journeyman for news and science reports every weekday: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures.html For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=65112 From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. Construction has stopped, unemployment has risen, food prices and inflation have soared. Throughout the 90's the whole region pursued unchecked economic growth and first world status. But Asia's economic miracle was built on a shaky foundation. Behind the massive expansion lurked political v...

    published: 05 Jan 2015
  • Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

    published: 27 Feb 2013
  • 60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

    60Seconds: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, which had its epi center in Thailand after the collapse of the Thai Baht, gripped most of East Asia and raised fears for a global economic meltdown. Stay tuned for the next episode of 60Seconds! Subscribe to ComCap Medias Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpxjp7xl8wgWvvDihcxb4Rw For the latest financial news, market updates and in-depth reports, visit our website: http://www.comcap.media Lets connect! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/comcapmedia Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComCapMedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/13218725

    published: 01 Dec 2016
  • What's Wrong With Asia's Financial Market?

    On Wednesday, April 29th, ISET hosted Mr. Donghyun Park, Asian Development Bank’s Principal Economist at Economics and Research Department. Mr. Park presented recently published ADB's Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2015 Theme Chapter “Financing Asia’s Future Growth”. ADO is the annual flagship report of the Asian Development Bank. On the presentation Mr. Park explained the role of a sound and efficient financial system in sustaining the region’s future growth. He started with explaining the existing dichotomy in Asian countries: many Asian countries (e.g. South Korea) have world class manufacturing sectors, while financial sector is relatively underdeveloped. As Mr. Park stated, after global financial crisis the growth rate of Asian countries, as well as in the rest of the world, slowed...

    published: 30 Apr 2015
  • Counting the Cost - Hong Kong: The future of Asia's financial hub

    Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe How will the election of a new leader in Hong Kong affect its financial freedom? At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affair...

    published: 25 Mar 2012
  • Dr. Ha-Joon Chang: The East Asian Economic Miracles In Historical Perspectives

    Dr Ha-Joon Chang is a Reader in the Faculty of Economics at Cambridge University. He teaches development economics at Cambridge and is known for his criticism of free-market fundamentalism and western development policy. Dr Chang was considered the 9th most influential world thinker by Prospect Magazine in 2014. He has served as a consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the European Investment Bank and to various United Nations agencies. He has written a great number of insightful articles and books, including his latest work- Economics: The User’s Guide (2014), the international bestseller - 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (2010) and most notably- Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (2002). Chang is also known for bein...

    published: 09 Feb 2017
  • IFC Builds Financial Capability of Low-income Households in East Asia & Pacific

    Karin Finkelston, IFC Vice President for Asia Pacific, talks about the importance of financial education for low-income households and micro, small, and medium enterprises. Finkelston gives examples of IFC's works in bridging the gap between financial institutions and people at the base of the pyramid. For more information on IFC's work in East Asia visit www.ifc.org/EastAsia

    published: 07 Dec 2011
  • Public Finance for Children in East Asia and Pacific

    published: 07 Aug 2013
  • Korean development in the east asian context

    Korean development in the east asian context with Dwight Perkins

    published: 09 Mar 2017
  • South East Asian Currency Crisis

    The video is a journey back to 1997 South East Asian Crisis and what caused it.

    published: 04 Nov 2008
  • East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

    http://www.weforum.org/ 19.06.2009 Asian economies have suffered severe shocks from the global economic downturn, yet are better placed than most for recovery thanks to lessons learned from the Asian financial crisis, significant stimulus packages and the potential to mobilize regional consumption. Who will lead the recovery in Asia, and which sectors are demonstrating the most promising growth prospects? Dominic Barton Max Burger-Calderon, Senior Partner and Chairman, Asia, Apax Partners, Hong Kong SAR Hoang Trung Hai, Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam Michael ByungJu Kim, Founding Partner, MBK Partners, Republic of Korea Kim Jeong, President, Bell Labs, Executive Vice-President, Alcatel-Lucent, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, USA Chaired by Phil Smith, Editor, North Asia, Thomson Reut...

    published: 07 Jul 2009
  • Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

    Oct. 23, 1998 Lee Kuan Yew, Senior Minister for the Republic of Singapore, discusses the origin of the current economic crisis in Asia.

    published: 21 May 2014
  • USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

    English/Nat U-S Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers says he doesn't hold the I-M-F responsible for the financial crisis which swept south east Asia two years ago worse. But he did admit the organisation had made mistakes. Summers, who has just returned from a tour of the region also says he's optimistic about south east Asia's economic prospects. It's a debate that still continues, did the international community make the right choices in responding to the Asian financial crisis? The International Monetary Fund (I-M-F) has acknowledged that it made some mistakes in its rescues of Thailand, South Korea and Indonesia in 1997 and 1998, most notably in underestimating the severity of those countries' recessions. But the I-M-F has largely dismissed criticism that it made the ...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Stock Market Investing: Asian Crisis, Downsizing & the Globalization of the U.S. Economy (1998)

    The Asian financial crisis was a period of financial crisis that gripped much of Asia beginning in July 1997, and raised fears of a worldwide economic meltdown due to financial contagion. The crisis started in Thailand (well known by the Thais as วิกฤตต้มยำกุ้ง, literally translated as Tom Yam Kung crisis) with the financial collapse of the Thai baht after the Thai government was forced to float the baht due to lack of foreign currency to support its fixed exchange rate, cutting its peg to the US$, after exhaustive efforts to support it in the face of a severe financial overextension that was in part real estate driven. At the time, Thailand had acquired a burden of foreign debt that made the country effectively bankrupt even before the collapse of its currency. As the crisis spread, most...

    published: 27 Nov 2013
  • East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

    http://www.weforum.org/ 12.06.2011 Given high-velocity growth and the rise of financial hubs in Asia, how will the region develop resilience to future financial shocks? The following dimensions are addressed: - Risks associated with asset bubbles - Prudent macroeconomic and fiscal policies - Corporate governance - Economic consequences of disasters Panel includes: • Michael Buchanan, Chief Economist, Asia-Pacific, Goldman Sachs (Singapore), SingaporeStuart T. Gulliver, Group Chief Executive, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on East Asia • Muliaman Hadad, Deputy Governor, Bank of Indonesia, IndonesiaOmar Lodhi, Chief Executive Officer, Abraaj Capital Asia, SingaporeAgus D. W. Martowardojo, Minister of Finance of Indonesia • Geoff Riddell, Membe...

    published: 12 Jun 2011
  • Inside Story - Financial crisis and Asia - 22 Sep 08 - Pt 1

    A special inside Story show from Kuala Lumpur where we examine how the financial turmoil on Wall Street has affected Asian markets and economies.

    published: 23 Sep 2008
  • 1997 Asian financial crisis

    The Asian financial crisis was a period of financial crisis that gripped much of East Asia beginning in July 1997 and raised fears of a worldwide economic meltdown due to financial contagion.The crisis started in Thailand with the financial collapse of the Thai baht after the Thai government was forced to float the baht due to lack of foreign currency to support its currency peg to the U.S.dollar.At the time, Thailand had acquired a burden of foreign debt that made the country effectively bankrupt even before the collapse of its currency. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Asian_Financial_Crisis_EN.png: *derivative work: PatrickFlaherty (talk) Asian_Financial_Crisis.png: Bamse derivative work: Bluej100 (talk) License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (CC...

    published: 17 Aug 2016
  • Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

    The Housing and Development Board (HDB), the national housing authority, was formed in February 1960, taking over housing responsibilities from its predecessor, the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT). HDB embarked on a massive programme to house the many people living in squatter settlements. Now, more than 80 per cent of Singapore’s population live in HDB flats. Singapore's first estate, Queenstown, was initiated by SIT in the 1950s but was fully developed by HDB. The second town, Toa Payoh, was the first to be planned and designed by HDB. There are now 23 towns across Singapore. David Marshall, leader of the Labour Front, became the first Chief Minister of Singapore. He presided over a shaky government, receiving little cooperation from either the colonial government or the other local pa...

    published: 27 May 2017
  • East Asia - Net Financial Flows, Bilateral - Time Lapse

    Based on the data freely available at data.worldbank.org

    published: 06 Jan 2017
The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2015
  • views: 21413
videos
CUT from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKXyJkfvkiQ&&
https://wn.com/The_Asian_Financial_Crisis_In_1997_Explanation
Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:33
  • Updated: 14 May 2012
  • views: 96305
videos
How a currency crisis in Thailand led to a banking crisis in the 1990s Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/math-mechanics-of-thai-banking-crisis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/speculative-attack-on-a-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
https://wn.com/Financial_Crisis_In_Thailand_Caused_By_Speculative_Attack_|_Macroeconomics_|_Khan_Academy
What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:27
  • Updated: 25 Nov 2015
  • views: 5368
videos
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Asian Crisis” During 1997-98, many of the East Asian tiger economies suffered a severe financial and economic crisis. This had big consequences for the global financial markets, which had become increasingly exposed to the promise that Asia had seemed to offer. The crisis destroyed wealth on a massive scale and sent absolute poverty shooting up. In the banking system alone, corporate loans equivalent to around half of one year's GDP went bad - a destruction of savings on a scale more usually associated with a full-scale war. The precise cause of the crisis remains a matter of debate. Fingers have been pointed at the currency peg adopted by some countries, and a reduction of capital controls in the years before the crisis. Some blamed economic contagion. The crisis brought an end to a then widespread belief that there was a distinct "Asian way" of capitalism that might prove just as successful as capitalism in America or Europe. Instead, critics turned their fire on Asian cronyism, ill-disciplined banking and lack of transparency. In the years following the crisis, most of the countries involved have introduced reforms designed to increase transparency and improve the health of the banking system, although some such as South Korea went much further than others like Indonesia. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
https://wn.com/What_Caused_1997_Asia's_Financial_Crisis
Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:39
  • Updated: 28 Aug 2014
  • views: 14100
videos
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_Of_1997
Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:33
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2013
  • views: 55392
videos
For IB Economics By Caro Bev and Judith Nav.
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_1997_Documentary
How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

  • Order:
  • Duration: 38:20
  • Updated: 05 Jan 2015
  • views: 17958
videos
Asian Values Devalued - Is Malaysia's campaign for democracy going backwards? Subscribe to Journeyman for news and science reports every weekday: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures.html For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=65112 From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. Construction has stopped, unemployment has risen, food prices and inflation have soared. Throughout the 90's the whole region pursued unchecked economic growth and first world status. But Asia's economic miracle was built on a shaky foundation. Behind the massive expansion lurked political values from the Middle Ages. The World Bank President sums the boom up: 'it had over-lending, corruption, cronyism, banks lending to its shareholders. Now, there's a comeuppance.' Indonesia's financial ruin was the catalyst for its social collapse. Suharto stands accused of plundering the nation's wealth, crushing those who protested. He ignored the extent of his country's economic crisis, and continued to reward his children and swarms of sycophants with unjust riches. But recent weeks saw Indonesians send their ruler a powerful message: the old values don't count. Almost like lightening, the world's second longest dictator stood down. Is Prime Minister Mahatir of neighbouring Malaysia making the same mistakes as Suharto? The economic crisis has ruffled Mahatir's feathers too. In power for 16 years, he is also known for corruption, cronyism and nepotism. Before the crash Suharto's family wealth was put at US$6 billion. Mahatir's three sons are directors of at least 200 companies. Both leaders made no secret of their 'crony capitalism': the best deals went to the government's best friends. Mahatir calls that 'the duty of government'. Both countries have put development above all other concerns. Indonesia's frenetic logging of the Borneo rainforest caused the terrible forest fires that raged there. Mahatir was furious when forced to abandon his scheme to flood ancient Sarawak rainforest by building the Bakun damn. The crisis in Indonesia made ethnic Chinese the target of resentful attacks. In Malaysia, the nervous Chinese have been scapegoats before. Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim is tipped for the top. In the spirit of the changing Asian values he concedes 'We've got to be more democratic. The younger generation would like to see greater transparency, and tolerance'. Indonesia's new President Habibie is now releasing political prisoners and promising an end to corruption. But as a child of the old system, it remains to be seen whether he is really the right man for the job. The excesses of the ruling Indonesian elite devalued as fast as the rupiah. Other countries in the region are still suffering the same economic turmoil, but have not yet seen such momentous political change. 'My pay's been cut, my tears now fill my car... I took years to buy it and it's being repossessed!' croons a Thai pop-star. Across the region the poor are getting poorer. The Tiger economies were forged with the sweat of cheap labour. As work dries up and food runs out, will the people's anger erupt elsewhere? In these most turbulent times, we ask whether Indonesia's powerful winds of change are set to blow across the whole of Asia. ABC Australia: Ref 424 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
https://wn.com/How_Asia's_Economic_Miracle_Collapsed
Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:30
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2013
  • views: 32149
videos
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_In_The_Nutshell
60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 01 Dec 2016
  • views: 1445
videos
60Seconds: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, which had its epi center in Thailand after the collapse of the Thai Baht, gripped most of East Asia and raised fears for a global economic meltdown. Stay tuned for the next episode of 60Seconds! Subscribe to ComCap Medias Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpxjp7xl8wgWvvDihcxb4Rw For the latest financial news, market updates and in-depth reports, visit our website: http://www.comcap.media Lets connect! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/comcapmedia Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComCapMedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/13218725
https://wn.com/60_Seconds_Asia_Crisis_1997
What's Wrong With Asia's Financial Market?

What's Wrong With Asia's Financial Market?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10:18
  • Updated: 30 Apr 2015
  • views: 129
videos
On Wednesday, April 29th, ISET hosted Mr. Donghyun Park, Asian Development Bank’s Principal Economist at Economics and Research Department. Mr. Park presented recently published ADB's Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2015 Theme Chapter “Financing Asia’s Future Growth”. ADO is the annual flagship report of the Asian Development Bank. On the presentation Mr. Park explained the role of a sound and efficient financial system in sustaining the region’s future growth. He started with explaining the existing dichotomy in Asian countries: many Asian countries (e.g. South Korea) have world class manufacturing sectors, while financial sector is relatively underdeveloped. As Mr. Park stated, after global financial crisis the growth rate of Asian countries, as well as in the rest of the world, slowed down, thus developing financial system became crucial for many countries. Mr. Park presented a research that confirms that financial development does boost economic growth. In the second part of the presentation, Ms. Kathie Julian, ADB country director in Georgia, provided some information about the mission and project of ADB in Georgia. Ms. Julian mentioned issuance of Lari denominated bond, issued by ADB this February to provide long-term capital to the economy and support improvement of domestic bond market. The presentation was followed by a Q&A session. ISET would like to thank Mr. Park for giving a very informative and interesting presentation to the ISET community.
https://wn.com/What's_Wrong_With_Asia's_Financial_Market
Counting the Cost - Hong Kong: The future of Asia's financial hub

Counting the Cost - Hong Kong: The future of Asia's financial hub

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:33
  • Updated: 25 Mar 2012
  • views: 7895
videos
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe How will the election of a new leader in Hong Kong affect its financial freedom? At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
https://wn.com/Counting_The_Cost_Hong_Kong_The_Future_Of_Asia's_Financial_Hub
Dr. Ha-Joon Chang: The East Asian Economic Miracles In Historical Perspectives

Dr. Ha-Joon Chang: The East Asian Economic Miracles In Historical Perspectives

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:29:47
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2017
  • views: 1559
videos
Dr Ha-Joon Chang is a Reader in the Faculty of Economics at Cambridge University. He teaches development economics at Cambridge and is known for his criticism of free-market fundamentalism and western development policy. Dr Chang was considered the 9th most influential world thinker by Prospect Magazine in 2014. He has served as a consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the European Investment Bank and to various United Nations agencies. He has written a great number of insightful articles and books, including his latest work- Economics: The User’s Guide (2014), the international bestseller - 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (2010) and most notably- Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (2002). Chang is also known for being an important academic influence on the economist Rafael Correa, currently President of Ecuador. 9-Nov-2016 Cambridge China Development Forum (CCDF): https://www.facebook.com/cambridgecucds/
https://wn.com/Dr._Ha_Joon_Chang_The_East_Asian_Economic_Miracles_In_Historical_Perspectives
IFC Builds Financial Capability of Low-income Households in East Asia & Pacific

IFC Builds Financial Capability of Low-income Households in East Asia & Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 07 Dec 2011
  • views: 271
videos
Karin Finkelston, IFC Vice President for Asia Pacific, talks about the importance of financial education for low-income households and micro, small, and medium enterprises. Finkelston gives examples of IFC's works in bridging the gap between financial institutions and people at the base of the pyramid. For more information on IFC's work in East Asia visit www.ifc.org/EastAsia
https://wn.com/Ifc_Builds_Financial_Capability_Of_Low_Income_Households_In_East_Asia_Pacific
Public Finance for Children in East Asia and Pacific

Public Finance for Children in East Asia and Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:26
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2013
  • views: 227
videos
https://wn.com/Public_Finance_For_Children_In_East_Asia_And_Pacific
Korean development in the east asian context

Korean development in the east asian context

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:18
  • Updated: 09 Mar 2017
  • views: 208
videos
Korean development in the east asian context with Dwight Perkins
https://wn.com/Korean_Development_In_The_East_Asian_Context
South East Asian Currency Crisis

South East Asian Currency Crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:24
  • Updated: 04 Nov 2008
  • views: 25363
videos
The video is a journey back to 1997 South East Asian Crisis and what caused it.
https://wn.com/South_East_Asian_Currency_Crisis
East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:15:18
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2009
  • views: 3346
videos
http://www.weforum.org/ 19.06.2009 Asian economies have suffered severe shocks from the global economic downturn, yet are better placed than most for recovery thanks to lessons learned from the Asian financial crisis, significant stimulus packages and the potential to mobilize regional consumption. Who will lead the recovery in Asia, and which sectors are demonstrating the most promising growth prospects? Dominic Barton Max Burger-Calderon, Senior Partner and Chairman, Asia, Apax Partners, Hong Kong SAR Hoang Trung Hai, Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam Michael ByungJu Kim, Founding Partner, MBK Partners, Republic of Korea Kim Jeong, President, Bell Labs, Executive Vice-President, Alcatel-Lucent, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, USA Chaired by Phil Smith, Editor, North Asia, Thomson Reuters, People's Republic of China
https://wn.com/East_Asia_2009_Towards_New_Drivers_Of_Growth
Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

  • Order:
  • Duration: 57:04
  • Updated: 21 May 2014
  • views: 61611
videos
Oct. 23, 1998 Lee Kuan Yew, Senior Minister for the Republic of Singapore, discusses the origin of the current economic crisis in Asia.
https://wn.com/Shell_Distinguished_Lecture_Series_The_Origin_Of_The_Meltdown_In_East_Asia
USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:36
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 187
videos
English/Nat U-S Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers says he doesn't hold the I-M-F responsible for the financial crisis which swept south east Asia two years ago worse. But he did admit the organisation had made mistakes. Summers, who has just returned from a tour of the region also says he's optimistic about south east Asia's economic prospects. It's a debate that still continues, did the international community make the right choices in responding to the Asian financial crisis? The International Monetary Fund (I-M-F) has acknowledged that it made some mistakes in its rescues of Thailand, South Korea and Indonesia in 1997 and 1998, most notably in underestimating the severity of those countries' recessions. But the I-M-F has largely dismissed criticism that it made the crisis worse by insisting the countries' governments adopt painful economic policies such as high interest rates. That criticism was aired again today at a hearing on the lessons learned when the international community jumped in to rescue Asian economies. The U-S Treasury Secretary, who has just returned from the region, says the I-M-F did need to improve its performance. SOUNDBITE: (English) "We have made progress in the effort to develop a 21st century IMF. But we have no doubt that further change is needed. We said many times last year that a well-funded IMF was indispensable to a stable global financial system. But as we also said at that time - that does not mean we can be satisfied with the IMF as it is." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary But Summers said he did not believe the I-M-F had made the problems of the Asian economies worse. SOUNDBITE: (English) "By far the greatest responsibility for causing, and responding effectively, to crises lies with countries themselves. The fact that most countries with IMF programmes in place have severe economic problems does not imply that the IMF is responsible for those problems - any more than the fact that most people in a hospital are severely ill would be evidence of medical malpractice." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary And he was optimistic about economic trends in the region. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I think it would be fair to say if you look at Asian economies as a group, their situation today is substantially better than the vast majority of observers expected a year ago." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary In the past, Summers' predecessor, Robert Rubin has said the Asian crisis illustrated the risks and opportunities of a global economy. It seems Summers agrees. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ade44aa736d3c2422effc5f2300261ec Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/USA_I_M_F_Not_Responsible_For_Asia'S_1997_Financial_Crisis
Stock Market Investing: Asian Crisis, Downsizing & the Globalization of the U.S. Economy (1998)

Stock Market Investing: Asian Crisis, Downsizing & the Globalization of the U.S. Economy (1998)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 59:36
  • Updated: 27 Nov 2013
  • views: 4950
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The Asian financial crisis was a period of financial crisis that gripped much of Asia beginning in July 1997, and raised fears of a worldwide economic meltdown due to financial contagion. The crisis started in Thailand (well known by the Thais as วิกฤตต้มยำกุ้ง, literally translated as Tom Yam Kung crisis) with the financial collapse of the Thai baht after the Thai government was forced to float the baht due to lack of foreign currency to support its fixed exchange rate, cutting its peg to the US$, after exhaustive efforts to support it in the face of a severe financial overextension that was in part real estate driven. At the time, Thailand had acquired a burden of foreign debt that made the country effectively bankrupt even before the collapse of its currency. As the crisis spread, most of Southeast Asia and Japan saw slumping currencies, devalued stock markets and other asset prices, and a precipitous rise in private debt. Indonesia, South Korea and Thailand were the countries most affected by the crisis. Hong Kong, Malaysia, Laos and the Philippines were also hurt by the slump. China, Taiwan, Singapore, Brunei and Vietnam were less affected, although all suffered from a loss of demand and confidence throughout the region. Foreign debt-to-GDP ratios rose from 100% to 167% in the four large Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) economies in 1993--96, then shot up beyond 180% during the worst of the crisis. In South Korea, the ratios rose from 13 to 21% and then as high as 40%, while the other northern newly industrialized countries fared much better. Only in Thailand and South Korea did debt service-to-exports ratios rise. Although most of the governments of Asia had seemingly sound fiscal policies, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) stepped in to initiate a $40 billion program to stabilize the currencies of South Korea, Thailand, and Indonesia, economies particularly hard hit by the crisis. The efforts to stem a global economic crisis did little to stabilize the domestic situation in Indonesia, however. After 30 years in power, President Suharto was forced to step down on 21 May 1998 in the wake of widespread rioting that followed sharp price increases caused by a drastic devaluation of the rupiah. The effects of the crisis lingered through 1998. In 1998 the Philippines growth dropped to virtually zero. Only Singapore and Taiwan proved relatively insulated from the shock, but both suffered serious hits in passing, the former more so due to its size and geographical location between Malaysia and Indonesia. By 1999, however, analysts saw signs that the economies of Asia were beginning to recover. After the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, economies in the region are working toward financial stability on financial supervision. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_crisis
https://wn.com/Stock_Market_Investing_Asian_Crisis,_Downsizing_The_Globalization_Of_The_U.S._Economy_(1998)
East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

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  • Duration: 1:16:22
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2011
  • views: 2864
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http://www.weforum.org/ 12.06.2011 Given high-velocity growth and the rise of financial hubs in Asia, how will the region develop resilience to future financial shocks? The following dimensions are addressed: - Risks associated with asset bubbles - Prudent macroeconomic and fiscal policies - Corporate governance - Economic consequences of disasters Panel includes: • Michael Buchanan, Chief Economist, Asia-Pacific, Goldman Sachs (Singapore), SingaporeStuart T. Gulliver, Group Chief Executive, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on East Asia • Muliaman Hadad, Deputy Governor, Bank of Indonesia, IndonesiaOmar Lodhi, Chief Executive Officer, Abraaj Capital Asia, SingaporeAgus D. W. Martowardojo, Minister of Finance of Indonesia • Geoff Riddell, Member of the Group Executive Committee and Regional Chairman, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa, Zurich Financial Services, Hong Kong SAR; Insurance & Asset Management Industry Agenda Council Chaired by Rishaad Salamat, TV Anchor/Reporter, Bloomberg, Hong Kong SAR
https://wn.com/East_Asia_2011_Financial_Fault_Lines_Averting_Aftershocks_In_Asia
Inside Story - Financial crisis and Asia - 22 Sep 08 - Pt 1

Inside Story - Financial crisis and Asia - 22 Sep 08 - Pt 1

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  • Duration: 11:46
  • Updated: 23 Sep 2008
  • views: 22615
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A special inside Story show from Kuala Lumpur where we examine how the financial turmoil on Wall Street has affected Asian markets and economies.
https://wn.com/Inside_Story_Financial_Crisis_And_Asia_22_Sep_08_Pt_1
1997 Asian financial crisis

1997 Asian financial crisis

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  • Duration: 30:42
  • Updated: 17 Aug 2016
  • views: 528
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The Asian financial crisis was a period of financial crisis that gripped much of East Asia beginning in July 1997 and raised fears of a worldwide economic meltdown due to financial contagion.The crisis started in Thailand with the financial collapse of the Thai baht after the Thai government was forced to float the baht due to lack of foreign currency to support its currency peg to the U.S.dollar.At the time, Thailand had acquired a burden of foreign debt that made the country effectively bankrupt even before the collapse of its currency. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Asian_Financial_Crisis_EN.png: *derivative work: PatrickFlaherty (talk) Asian_Financial_Crisis.png: Bamse derivative work: Bluej100 (talk) License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (CC-BY-SA-3.0) Author(s): PatrickFlaherty (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:PatrickFlaherty) talk (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User_talk:PatrickFlaherty) Bamse (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Bamse) Bluej100 (https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Bluej100&action=edit&redlink=1) ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
https://wn.com/1997_Asian_Financial_Crisis
Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

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  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 27 May 2017
  • views: 58
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The Housing and Development Board (HDB), the national housing authority, was formed in February 1960, taking over housing responsibilities from its predecessor, the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT). HDB embarked on a massive programme to house the many people living in squatter settlements. Now, more than 80 per cent of Singapore’s population live in HDB flats. Singapore's first estate, Queenstown, was initiated by SIT in the 1950s but was fully developed by HDB. The second town, Toa Payoh, was the first to be planned and designed by HDB. There are now 23 towns across Singapore. David Marshall, leader of the Labour Front, became the first Chief Minister of Singapore. He presided over a shaky government, receiving little cooperation from either the colonial government or the other local parties. Social unrest was on the rise, and in May 1955, the Hock Lee bus riots broke out, killing four people and seriously discrediting Marshall's government. In 1956, the Chinese middle school riots broke out among students in The Chinese High School and other schools, further increasing the tension between the local government and the Chinese students and unionists who were regarded of having communist sympathies. In April 1956, Marshall led a delegation to London to negotiate for complete self-rule in the Merdeka Talks, but the talks failed when the British were reluctant to give up control over Singapore's internal security. The British were concerned about communist influence and labour strikes which were undermining Singapore's economic stability, and felt that the local government was ineffective in handling earlier riots. Marshall resigned following the failure of the talk. The new Chief MinisterLim Yew Hock, launched a crackdown on communist and leftist groups, imprisoning many trade union leaders and several pro-communist members of the PAP under the Internal Security Act. The British government approved of Lim's tough stance against communist agitators, and when a new round of talks was held beginning in March 1957, they agreed to grant complete internal self-government. A State of Singapore would be created, with its own citizenship. The Legislative Assembly would be expanded to fifty-one members, entirely chosen by popular election, and the Prime Minister and cabinet would control all aspects of government except defense and foreign affairs. The governorship was replaced by a Yang di-Pertuan Negara or head of state. In August 1958, the State of Singapore Act was passed in the United Kingdom Parliament providing for the establishment of the State of Singapore. This material been used for Educational purpose only. Singapore Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia © 1957
https://wn.com/Singapore_1957_Steps_To_Financial_Hub_Of_South_East_Asia
East Asia - Net Financial Flows, Bilateral - Time Lapse

East Asia - Net Financial Flows, Bilateral - Time Lapse

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  • Duration: 1:02
  • Updated: 06 Jan 2017
  • views: 0
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Based on the data freely available at data.worldbank.org
https://wn.com/East_Asia_Net_Financial_Flows,_Bilateral_Time_Lapse