• The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

    CUT from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKXyJkfvkiQ&&

    published: 13 Nov 2015
  • What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

    Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Asian Crisis” During 1997-98, many of the East Asian tiger economies suffered a severe financial and economic crisis. This had big consequences for the global financial markets, which had become increasingly exposed to the promise that Asia had seemed to offer. The crisis destroyed wealth on a massive scale and sent absolute poverty shooting up. In the banking system alone, corporate loans equivalent to around half of one year's GDP went bad - a destruction of savings on a scale more usually associated with a full-scale war. The precise cause of the crisis remains a matter of debate. Fingers have been pointed at the currency peg adopted by some countries, and a reduction of c...

    published: 25 Nov 2015
  • Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

    How a currency crisis in Thailand led to a banking crisis in the 1990s Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/math-mechanics-of-thai-banking-crisis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/speculative-attack-on-a-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their ow...

    published: 14 May 2012
  • Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

    For IB Economics By Caro Bev and Judith Nav.

    published: 28 Apr 2013
  • Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

    published: 28 Aug 2014
  • How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

    Asian Values Devalued - Is Malaysia's campaign for democracy going backwards? Subscribe to Journeyman for news and science reports every weekday: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures.html For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=65112 From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. Construction has stopped, unemployment has risen, food prices and inflation have soared. Throughout the 90's the whole region pursued unchecked economic growth and first world status. But Asia's economic miracle was built on a shaky foundation. Behind the massive expansion lurked political v...

    published: 05 Jan 2015
  • Mahathir vs The IMF: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis

    20 years since the Asian Financial Crisis, a look back at how Malaysia's then-Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad defied the International Monetary Fund, and his subsequent clash with his deputy Anwar Ibrahim. Has Malaysia come out of the crisis for better or for worse in the long run, as a result of his rejection of the IMF's measures? The full Insight episode: https://cna.asia/2uVoe5t

    published: 25 Jul 2017
  • 60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

    60Seconds: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, which had its epi center in Thailand after the collapse of the Thai Baht, gripped most of East Asia and raised fears for a global economic meltdown. Stay tuned for the next episode of 60Seconds! Subscribe to ComCap Medias Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpxjp7xl8wgWvvDihcxb4Rw For the latest financial news, market updates and in-depth reports, visit our website: http://www.comcap.media Lets connect! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/comcapmedia Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComCapMedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/13218725

    published: 01 Dec 2016
  • East Asia to follow European exchange rate model? | World Finance

    Economist tells World Finance that engaging in swap agreements rather than formalised currency coordination lets the RMB raise its currency stature while weakening reliance on foreign reserves, a model Europe could also consider. For a full transcript visit: http://www.worldfinance.com/videos/east-asia-to-follow-european-exchange-rate-model For more World Finance videos go to http://www.worldfinance.com/videos/

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Global financial Stability Conference 2017

    2017 글로벌 금융안정 컨퍼런스 Back in 1997, East Asia was gripped by a financial crisis that pulled the rug out from under the region's stock markets and currencies. To discuss the best ways of preventing another such crisis, Seoul is hosting a conference for economists, researchers and officials from the region... who made several recommendations for a financial safety net. Won Jung-hwan has more. The Ministry of Strategy and Finance and Korea Development Institute jointly hosted the 2017 Global Financial Stability Conference in Seoul on Wednesday, looking into ways to improve global financial market stability amid the current trend of trade protectionism and slowing productivity. (ENGLISH) "Korea advanced the global financial safety net agenda at the 2010 G20 Summit, and this is the only...

    published: 15 Nov 2017
  • Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

    Oct. 23, 1998 Lee Kuan Yew, Senior Minister for the Republic of Singapore, discusses the origin of the current economic crisis in Asia.

    published: 21 May 2014
  • Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

    The Housing and Development Board (HDB), the national housing authority, was formed in February 1960, taking over housing responsibilities from its predecessor, the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT). HDB embarked on a massive programme to house the many people living in squatter settlements. Now, more than 80 per cent of Singapore’s population live in HDB flats. Singapore's first estate, Queenstown, was initiated by SIT in the 1950s but was fully developed by HDB. The second town, Toa Payoh, was the first to be planned and designed by HDB. There are now 23 towns across Singapore. David Marshall, leader of the Labour Front, became the first Chief Minister of Singapore. He presided over a shaky government, receiving little cooperation from either the colonial government or the other local pa...

    published: 27 May 2017
  • East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

    http://www.weforum.org/ 19.06.2009 Asian economies have suffered severe shocks from the global economic downturn, yet are better placed than most for recovery thanks to lessons learned from the Asian financial crisis, significant stimulus packages and the potential to mobilize regional consumption. Who will lead the recovery in Asia, and which sectors are demonstrating the most promising growth prospects? Dominic Barton Max Burger-Calderon, Senior Partner and Chairman, Asia, Apax Partners, Hong Kong SAR Hoang Trung Hai, Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam Michael ByungJu Kim, Founding Partner, MBK Partners, Republic of Korea Kim Jeong, President, Bell Labs, Executive Vice-President, Alcatel-Lucent, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, USA Chaired by Phil Smith, Editor, North Asia, Thomson Reut...

    published: 07 Jul 2009
  • Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

    published: 27 Feb 2013
  • South East Asian Currency Crisis

    The video is a journey back to 1997 South East Asian Crisis and what caused it.

    published: 04 Nov 2008
  • East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

    http://www.weforum.org/ 12.06.2011 Given high-velocity growth and the rise of financial hubs in Asia, how will the region develop resilience to future financial shocks? The following dimensions are addressed: - Risks associated with asset bubbles - Prudent macroeconomic and fiscal policies - Corporate governance - Economic consequences of disasters Panel includes: • Michael Buchanan, Chief Economist, Asia-Pacific, Goldman Sachs (Singapore), SingaporeStuart T. Gulliver, Group Chief Executive, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on East Asia • Muliaman Hadad, Deputy Governor, Bank of Indonesia, IndonesiaOmar Lodhi, Chief Executive Officer, Abraaj Capital Asia, SingaporeAgus D. W. Martowardojo, Minister of Finance of Indonesia • Geoff Riddell, Membe...

    published: 12 Jun 2011
  • USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

    English/Nat U-S Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers says he doesn't hold the I-M-F responsible for the financial crisis which swept south east Asia two years ago worse. But he did admit the organisation had made mistakes. Summers, who has just returned from a tour of the region also says he's optimistic about south east Asia's economic prospects. It's a debate that still continues, did the international community make the right choices in responding to the Asian financial crisis? The International Monetary Fund (I-M-F) has acknowledged that it made some mistakes in its rescues of Thailand, South Korea and Indonesia in 1997 and 1998, most notably in underestimating the severity of those countries' recessions. But the I-M-F has largely dismissed criticism that it made the ...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Monetary and Financial Cooperation in East Asia The State of Affairs After the Global and European C

    published: 10 Mar 2016
  • South Korea marks unhappy anniversary of Asia's financial crisis

    When South Korea's economy was facing ruin two decades ago, the government was rescued by the International Monetary Fund in a multi-billion dollar bailout. It has enjoyed an incredible recovery since then and is touted as a success story amongst Asian economies. But many South Koreans still remember giving up their gold in exchange for cash. Al Jazeera's Kathy Novak reports from Seoul. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

    published: 21 Nov 2017
  • The Crash Asian crisis

    published: 07 Jul 2011
  • Why the Asian Financial Crisis Happened: Diagnosis, Remedies & Prospects (1998)

    The causes of the debacle are many and disputed. Thailand's economy developed into an economic bubble fueled by hot money. More and more was required as the size of the bubble grew. The same type of situation happened in Malaysia, and Indonesia, which had the added complication of what was called "crony capitalism".[7] The short-term capital flow was expensive and often highly conditioned for quick profit. Development money went in a largely uncontrolled manner to certain people only, not particularly the best suited or most efficient, but those closest to the centers of power.[8] At the time of the mid-1990s, Thailand, Indonesia and South Korea had large private current account deficits and the maintenance of fixed exchange rates encouraged external borrowing and led to excessive exposur...

    published: 13 Dec 2014
  • Twenty Years After the Asian Financial Crisis

    Twenty years have passed since the Asian financial crisis, a landmark event that triggered massive economic disruption in the heart of Asia even as its shockwaves reached as far afield as Russia and Brazil. In a few Southeast Asian countries, political and economic institutions were shaken to their very core and economic progress and poverty reduction were set back by years. Join us for a look back on how these economies fared during the crisis and in the years since. Panelists will ask whether the economic institutions these countries rebuilt or restored will prove capable of managing future economic shocks. This event is co-sponsored by the Johns Hopkins SAIS Asia Programs, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office. Moderator: Vikram ...

    published: 12 Oct 2017
  • SOUTH EAST ASIA 1998 2006

    published: 30 Apr 2015
  • Thailand - Asia's financial crisis

    T/I 10:51:53 About 5,000 Thai government civil servants and bank workers turned up for a one kilometre march through Bangkok's major shopping centre Sunday (11/1) in response to Asia's financial crisis. The financial crisis has spawned a different kind of flea market on Bangkok streets. Second hand luxurious things like Mercedes cars, Rolex watches and designers' clothes, are now found on sale in Bangkok on a much bigger scale. SHOWS: BANGKOK, THAILAND 11/01 High shot of marchers, VS of marchers, marchers waving Thai flags; Man showing US dollar in one hand and 30 Thai bahts in the other (showing the current exchange rate); sign showing the exchange rate; People changing foreign currency for Thai bahts; Man exchanging his money, man receiving a badge for exc...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
developed with YouTube
The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

The Asian Financial Crisis in 1997 - Explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2015
  • views: 32158
videos
CUT from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKXyJkfvkiQ&&
https://wn.com/The_Asian_Financial_Crisis_In_1997_Explanation
What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

What Caused 1997 Asia's Financial Crisis?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:27
  • Updated: 25 Nov 2015
  • views: 8543
videos
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Asian Crisis” During 1997-98, many of the East Asian tiger economies suffered a severe financial and economic crisis. This had big consequences for the global financial markets, which had become increasingly exposed to the promise that Asia had seemed to offer. The crisis destroyed wealth on a massive scale and sent absolute poverty shooting up. In the banking system alone, corporate loans equivalent to around half of one year's GDP went bad - a destruction of savings on a scale more usually associated with a full-scale war. The precise cause of the crisis remains a matter of debate. Fingers have been pointed at the currency peg adopted by some countries, and a reduction of capital controls in the years before the crisis. Some blamed economic contagion. The crisis brought an end to a then widespread belief that there was a distinct "Asian way" of capitalism that might prove just as successful as capitalism in America or Europe. Instead, critics turned their fire on Asian cronyism, ill-disciplined banking and lack of transparency. In the years following the crisis, most of the countries involved have introduced reforms designed to increase transparency and improve the health of the banking system, although some such as South Korea went much further than others like Indonesia. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
https://wn.com/What_Caused_1997_Asia's_Financial_Crisis
Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

Financial crisis in Thailand caused by speculative attack | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:33
  • Updated: 14 May 2012
  • views: 108628
videos
How a currency crisis in Thailand led to a banking crisis in the 1990s Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/math-mechanics-of-thai-banking-crisis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/speculative-attack-on-a-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
https://wn.com/Financial_Crisis_In_Thailand_Caused_By_Speculative_Attack_|_Macroeconomics_|_Khan_Academy
Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

Asian Financial crisis 1997 documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:33
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2013
  • views: 62198
videos
For IB Economics By Caro Bev and Judith Nav.
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_1997_Documentary
Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

Asian Financial Crisis of 1997

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:39
  • Updated: 28 Aug 2014
  • views: 18184
videos
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_Of_1997
How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

How Asia's Economic Miracle Collapsed

  • Order:
  • Duration: 38:20
  • Updated: 05 Jan 2015
  • views: 22561
videos
Asian Values Devalued - Is Malaysia's campaign for democracy going backwards? Subscribe to Journeyman for news and science reports every weekday: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures.html For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=65112 From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. From the skyscrapers of Hong Kong to the ransacked streets of Jakarta, the Asian Renaissance is over. Construction has stopped, unemployment has risen, food prices and inflation have soared. Throughout the 90's the whole region pursued unchecked economic growth and first world status. But Asia's economic miracle was built on a shaky foundation. Behind the massive expansion lurked political values from the Middle Ages. The World Bank President sums the boom up: 'it had over-lending, corruption, cronyism, banks lending to its shareholders. Now, there's a comeuppance.' Indonesia's financial ruin was the catalyst for its social collapse. Suharto stands accused of plundering the nation's wealth, crushing those who protested. He ignored the extent of his country's economic crisis, and continued to reward his children and swarms of sycophants with unjust riches. But recent weeks saw Indonesians send their ruler a powerful message: the old values don't count. Almost like lightening, the world's second longest dictator stood down. Is Prime Minister Mahatir of neighbouring Malaysia making the same mistakes as Suharto? The economic crisis has ruffled Mahatir's feathers too. In power for 16 years, he is also known for corruption, cronyism and nepotism. Before the crash Suharto's family wealth was put at US$6 billion. Mahatir's three sons are directors of at least 200 companies. Both leaders made no secret of their 'crony capitalism': the best deals went to the government's best friends. Mahatir calls that 'the duty of government'. Both countries have put development above all other concerns. Indonesia's frenetic logging of the Borneo rainforest caused the terrible forest fires that raged there. Mahatir was furious when forced to abandon his scheme to flood ancient Sarawak rainforest by building the Bakun damn. The crisis in Indonesia made ethnic Chinese the target of resentful attacks. In Malaysia, the nervous Chinese have been scapegoats before. Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim is tipped for the top. In the spirit of the changing Asian values he concedes 'We've got to be more democratic. The younger generation would like to see greater transparency, and tolerance'. Indonesia's new President Habibie is now releasing political prisoners and promising an end to corruption. But as a child of the old system, it remains to be seen whether he is really the right man for the job. The excesses of the ruling Indonesian elite devalued as fast as the rupiah. Other countries in the region are still suffering the same economic turmoil, but have not yet seen such momentous political change. 'My pay's been cut, my tears now fill my car... I took years to buy it and it's being repossessed!' croons a Thai pop-star. Across the region the poor are getting poorer. The Tiger economies were forged with the sweat of cheap labour. As work dries up and food runs out, will the people's anger erupt elsewhere? In these most turbulent times, we ask whether Indonesia's powerful winds of change are set to blow across the whole of Asia. ABC Australia: Ref 424 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
https://wn.com/How_Asia's_Economic_Miracle_Collapsed
Mahathir vs The IMF: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis

Mahathir vs The IMF: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:47
  • Updated: 25 Jul 2017
  • views: 5060
videos
20 years since the Asian Financial Crisis, a look back at how Malaysia's then-Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad defied the International Monetary Fund, and his subsequent clash with his deputy Anwar Ibrahim. Has Malaysia come out of the crisis for better or for worse in the long run, as a result of his rejection of the IMF's measures? The full Insight episode: https://cna.asia/2uVoe5t
https://wn.com/Mahathir_Vs_The_Imf_The_1997_Asian_Financial_Crisis
60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

60 Seconds: Asia Crisis 1997

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 01 Dec 2016
  • views: 3067
videos
60Seconds: The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, which had its epi center in Thailand after the collapse of the Thai Baht, gripped most of East Asia and raised fears for a global economic meltdown. Stay tuned for the next episode of 60Seconds! Subscribe to ComCap Medias Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpxjp7xl8wgWvvDihcxb4Rw For the latest financial news, market updates and in-depth reports, visit our website: http://www.comcap.media Lets connect! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/comcapmedia Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComCapMedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/13218725
https://wn.com/60_Seconds_Asia_Crisis_1997
East Asia to follow European exchange rate model? | World Finance

East Asia to follow European exchange rate model? | World Finance

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:33
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 38
videos
Economist tells World Finance that engaging in swap agreements rather than formalised currency coordination lets the RMB raise its currency stature while weakening reliance on foreign reserves, a model Europe could also consider. For a full transcript visit: http://www.worldfinance.com/videos/east-asia-to-follow-european-exchange-rate-model For more World Finance videos go to http://www.worldfinance.com/videos/
https://wn.com/East_Asia_To_Follow_European_Exchange_Rate_Model_|_World_Finance
Global financial Stability Conference 2017

Global financial Stability Conference 2017

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 15 Nov 2017
  • views: 28
videos
2017 글로벌 금융안정 컨퍼런스 Back in 1997, East Asia was gripped by a financial crisis that pulled the rug out from under the region's stock markets and currencies. To discuss the best ways of preventing another such crisis, Seoul is hosting a conference for economists, researchers and officials from the region... who made several recommendations for a financial safety net. Won Jung-hwan has more. The Ministry of Strategy and Finance and Korea Development Institute jointly hosted the 2017 Global Financial Stability Conference in Seoul on Wednesday, looking into ways to improve global financial market stability amid the current trend of trade protectionism and slowing productivity. (ENGLISH) "Korea advanced the global financial safety net agenda at the 2010 G20 Summit, and this is the only global financial stability conference on a regular basis". Under the theme of 'The Asian Crisis 20 Years Later', the conference provided an opportunity to revisit the policy environments of Asian countries during the crisis. (STANDUP) "Twenty years have passed since the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis. At the time, the Korean economy experienced unprecedented difficulties, watching its foreign debt-to-GDP ratio rise from 13-percent to 21-percent and then as high as 40-percent." The conditions of the International Monetary Fund's bailout package meant Seoul had to carry out tough structural reform, leading to the collapse of many banks and businesses. According to a survey released by the KDI on Tuesday, almost 60-percent of the one thousand respondents said the financial crisis was the most difficult period for Korea in its history. And, more than half the respondents think the 1997 Asian financial crisis had an adverse impact on the economy, society and their daily lives,... with only 8-percent saying it had a positive impact. In order to prevent a repeat of the 1997 Asian financial crisis, the experts at the conference recommended measures such as avoiding currency overvaluation, keeping adequate foreign reserves, and securing access to regional and global financial safety nets. Twenty years have passed since the crisis, but this conference shows the efforts economies in the region are making in order to maintain financial stability. Won Jung-hwan, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
https://wn.com/Global_Financial_Stability_Conference_2017
Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

Shell Distinguished Lecture Series: The Origin of the Meltdown in East Asia

  • Order:
  • Duration: 57:04
  • Updated: 21 May 2014
  • views: 68622
videos
Oct. 23, 1998 Lee Kuan Yew, Senior Minister for the Republic of Singapore, discusses the origin of the current economic crisis in Asia.
https://wn.com/Shell_Distinguished_Lecture_Series_The_Origin_Of_The_Meltdown_In_East_Asia
Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

Singapore 1957 Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 27 May 2017
  • views: 95
videos
The Housing and Development Board (HDB), the national housing authority, was formed in February 1960, taking over housing responsibilities from its predecessor, the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT). HDB embarked on a massive programme to house the many people living in squatter settlements. Now, more than 80 per cent of Singapore’s population live in HDB flats. Singapore's first estate, Queenstown, was initiated by SIT in the 1950s but was fully developed by HDB. The second town, Toa Payoh, was the first to be planned and designed by HDB. There are now 23 towns across Singapore. David Marshall, leader of the Labour Front, became the first Chief Minister of Singapore. He presided over a shaky government, receiving little cooperation from either the colonial government or the other local parties. Social unrest was on the rise, and in May 1955, the Hock Lee bus riots broke out, killing four people and seriously discrediting Marshall's government. In 1956, the Chinese middle school riots broke out among students in The Chinese High School and other schools, further increasing the tension between the local government and the Chinese students and unionists who were regarded of having communist sympathies. In April 1956, Marshall led a delegation to London to negotiate for complete self-rule in the Merdeka Talks, but the talks failed when the British were reluctant to give up control over Singapore's internal security. The British were concerned about communist influence and labour strikes which were undermining Singapore's economic stability, and felt that the local government was ineffective in handling earlier riots. Marshall resigned following the failure of the talk. The new Chief MinisterLim Yew Hock, launched a crackdown on communist and leftist groups, imprisoning many trade union leaders and several pro-communist members of the PAP under the Internal Security Act. The British government approved of Lim's tough stance against communist agitators, and when a new round of talks was held beginning in March 1957, they agreed to grant complete internal self-government. A State of Singapore would be created, with its own citizenship. The Legislative Assembly would be expanded to fifty-one members, entirely chosen by popular election, and the Prime Minister and cabinet would control all aspects of government except defense and foreign affairs. The governorship was replaced by a Yang di-Pertuan Negara or head of state. In August 1958, the State of Singapore Act was passed in the United Kingdom Parliament providing for the establishment of the State of Singapore. This material been used for Educational purpose only. Singapore Steps to Financial Hub of South East Asia © 1957
https://wn.com/Singapore_1957_Steps_To_Financial_Hub_Of_South_East_Asia
East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

East Asia 2009 - Towards New Drivers of Growth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:15:18
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2009
  • views: 3488
videos
http://www.weforum.org/ 19.06.2009 Asian economies have suffered severe shocks from the global economic downturn, yet are better placed than most for recovery thanks to lessons learned from the Asian financial crisis, significant stimulus packages and the potential to mobilize regional consumption. Who will lead the recovery in Asia, and which sectors are demonstrating the most promising growth prospects? Dominic Barton Max Burger-Calderon, Senior Partner and Chairman, Asia, Apax Partners, Hong Kong SAR Hoang Trung Hai, Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam Michael ByungJu Kim, Founding Partner, MBK Partners, Republic of Korea Kim Jeong, President, Bell Labs, Executive Vice-President, Alcatel-Lucent, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, USA Chaired by Phil Smith, Editor, North Asia, Thomson Reuters, People's Republic of China
https://wn.com/East_Asia_2009_Towards_New_Drivers_Of_Growth
Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

Asian Financial Crisis in the nutshell

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:30
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2013
  • views: 33995
videos
https://wn.com/Asian_Financial_Crisis_In_The_Nutshell
South East Asian Currency Crisis

South East Asian Currency Crisis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:24
  • Updated: 04 Nov 2008
  • views: 25639
videos
The video is a journey back to 1997 South East Asian Crisis and what caused it.
https://wn.com/South_East_Asian_Currency_Crisis
East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

East Asia 2011 - Financial Fault Lines: Averting Aftershocks in Asia

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:16:22
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2011
  • views: 2876
videos
http://www.weforum.org/ 12.06.2011 Given high-velocity growth and the rise of financial hubs in Asia, how will the region develop resilience to future financial shocks? The following dimensions are addressed: - Risks associated with asset bubbles - Prudent macroeconomic and fiscal policies - Corporate governance - Economic consequences of disasters Panel includes: • Michael Buchanan, Chief Economist, Asia-Pacific, Goldman Sachs (Singapore), SingaporeStuart T. Gulliver, Group Chief Executive, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on East Asia • Muliaman Hadad, Deputy Governor, Bank of Indonesia, IndonesiaOmar Lodhi, Chief Executive Officer, Abraaj Capital Asia, SingaporeAgus D. W. Martowardojo, Minister of Finance of Indonesia • Geoff Riddell, Member of the Group Executive Committee and Regional Chairman, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa, Zurich Financial Services, Hong Kong SAR; Insurance & Asset Management Industry Agenda Council Chaired by Rishaad Salamat, TV Anchor/Reporter, Bloomberg, Hong Kong SAR
https://wn.com/East_Asia_2011_Financial_Fault_Lines_Averting_Aftershocks_In_Asia
USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

USA: I-M-F NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ASIA'S 1997 FINANCIAL CRISIS

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:36
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 229
videos
English/Nat U-S Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers says he doesn't hold the I-M-F responsible for the financial crisis which swept south east Asia two years ago worse. But he did admit the organisation had made mistakes. Summers, who has just returned from a tour of the region also says he's optimistic about south east Asia's economic prospects. It's a debate that still continues, did the international community make the right choices in responding to the Asian financial crisis? The International Monetary Fund (I-M-F) has acknowledged that it made some mistakes in its rescues of Thailand, South Korea and Indonesia in 1997 and 1998, most notably in underestimating the severity of those countries' recessions. But the I-M-F has largely dismissed criticism that it made the crisis worse by insisting the countries' governments adopt painful economic policies such as high interest rates. That criticism was aired again today at a hearing on the lessons learned when the international community jumped in to rescue Asian economies. The U-S Treasury Secretary, who has just returned from the region, says the I-M-F did need to improve its performance. SOUNDBITE: (English) "We have made progress in the effort to develop a 21st century IMF. But we have no doubt that further change is needed. We said many times last year that a well-funded IMF was indispensable to a stable global financial system. But as we also said at that time - that does not mean we can be satisfied with the IMF as it is." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary But Summers said he did not believe the I-M-F had made the problems of the Asian economies worse. SOUNDBITE: (English) "By far the greatest responsibility for causing, and responding effectively, to crises lies with countries themselves. The fact that most countries with IMF programmes in place have severe economic problems does not imply that the IMF is responsible for those problems - any more than the fact that most people in a hospital are severely ill would be evidence of medical malpractice." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary And he was optimistic about economic trends in the region. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I think it would be fair to say if you look at Asian economies as a group, their situation today is substantially better than the vast majority of observers expected a year ago." SUPER CAPTION: Lawrence Summers, U.S. Treasury Secretary In the past, Summers' predecessor, Robert Rubin has said the Asian crisis illustrated the risks and opportunities of a global economy. It seems Summers agrees. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ade44aa736d3c2422effc5f2300261ec Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Monetary and Financial Cooperation in East Asia The State of Affairs After the Global and European C

Monetary and Financial Cooperation in East Asia The State of Affairs After the Global and European C

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  • Duration: 0:15
  • Updated: 10 Mar 2016
  • views: 1
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South Korea marks unhappy anniversary of Asia's financial crisis

South Korea marks unhappy anniversary of Asia's financial crisis

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  • Duration: 2:46
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2017
  • views: 5150
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When South Korea's economy was facing ruin two decades ago, the government was rescued by the International Monetary Fund in a multi-billion dollar bailout. It has enjoyed an incredible recovery since then and is touted as a success story amongst Asian economies. But many South Koreans still remember giving up their gold in exchange for cash. Al Jazeera's Kathy Novak reports from Seoul. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/South_Korea_Marks_Unhappy_Anniversary_Of_Asia's_Financial_Crisis
The Crash   Asian crisis

The Crash Asian crisis

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  • Duration: 15:04
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2011
  • views: 19730
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Why the Asian Financial Crisis Happened: Diagnosis, Remedies & Prospects (1998)

Why the Asian Financial Crisis Happened: Diagnosis, Remedies & Prospects (1998)

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  • Duration: 2:41:13
  • Updated: 13 Dec 2014
  • views: 8752
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The causes of the debacle are many and disputed. Thailand's economy developed into an economic bubble fueled by hot money. More and more was required as the size of the bubble grew. The same type of situation happened in Malaysia, and Indonesia, which had the added complication of what was called "crony capitalism".[7] The short-term capital flow was expensive and often highly conditioned for quick profit. Development money went in a largely uncontrolled manner to certain people only, not particularly the best suited or most efficient, but those closest to the centers of power.[8] At the time of the mid-1990s, Thailand, Indonesia and South Korea had large private current account deficits and the maintenance of fixed exchange rates encouraged external borrowing and led to excessive exposure to foreign exchange risk in both the financial and corporate sectors. In the mid-1990s, a series of external shocks began to change the economic environment – the devaluation of the Chinese renminbi, and the Japanese yen due to the Plaza Accord of 1985, raising of US interest rates which led to a strong U.S. dollar, the sharp decline in semiconductor prices; adversely affected their growth.[9] As the U.S. economy recovered from a recession in the early 1990s, the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank under Alan Greenspan began to raise U.S. interest rates to head off inflation. This made the U.S. a more attractive investment destination relative to Southeast Asia, which had been attracting hot money flows through high short-term interest rates, and raised the value of the U.S. dollar. For the Southeast Asian nations which had currencies pegged to the U.S. dollar, the higher U.S. dollar caused their own exports to become more expensive and less competitive in the global markets. At the same time, Southeast Asia's export growth slowed dramatically in the spring of 1996, deteriorating their current account position. Some economists have advanced the growing exports of China as a contributing factor to ASEAN nations' export growth slowdown, though these economists maintain the main cause of the crises was excessive real estate speculation.[10] China had begun to compete effectively with other Asian exporters particularly in the 1990s after the implementation of a number of export-oriented reforms. Other economists dispute China's impact, noting that both ASEAN and China experienced simultaneous rapid export growth in the early 1990s.[11] Many economists believe that the Asian crisis was created not by market psychology or technology, but by policies that distorted incentives within the lender–borrower relationship. The resulting large quantities of credit that became available generated a highly leveraged economic climate, and pushed up asset prices to an unsustainable level.[12] These asset prices eventually began to collapse, causing individuals and companies to default on debt obligations. Other economists, including Joseph Stiglitz and Jeffrey Sachs, have downplayed the role of the real economy in the crisis compared to the financial markets. The rapidity with which the crisis happened has prompted Sachs and others to compare it to a classic bank run prompted by a sudden risk shock. Sachs pointed to strict monetary and contractory fiscal policies implemented by the governments on the advice of the IMF in the wake of the crisis, while Frederic Mishkin points to the role of asymmetric information in the financial markets that led to a "herd mentality" among investors that magnified a small risk in the real economy. The crisis has thus attracted interest from behavioral economists interested in market psychology.[13] Another possible cause of the sudden risk shock may also be attributable to the handover of Hong Kong sovereignty on 1 July 1997. During the 1990s, hot money flew into the Southeast Asia region through financial hubs, especially Hong Kong. The investors were often ignorant of the actual fundamentals or risk profiles of the respective economies, and once the crisis gripped the region, coupled with the political uncertainty regarding the future of Hong Kong as an Asian financial centre led some investors to withdraw from Asia altogether. This shrink in investments only worsened the financial conditions in Asia[14] (subsequently leading to the depreciation of the Thai baht on 2 July 1997).[15] Several case studies on the topic – Application of network analysis of a financial system; explains the interconnectivity of financial markets, and the significance of the robustness of hubs or the main nodes. Any negative externalities in the hubs creates a ripple effect through the financial system and the economy (and, the connected economies) as a whole. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1997_Asian_financial_crisis
https://wn.com/Why_The_Asian_Financial_Crisis_Happened_Diagnosis,_Remedies_Prospects_(1998)
Twenty Years After the Asian Financial Crisis

Twenty Years After the Asian Financial Crisis

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  • Duration: 1:30:54
  • Updated: 12 Oct 2017
  • views: 169
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Twenty years have passed since the Asian financial crisis, a landmark event that triggered massive economic disruption in the heart of Asia even as its shockwaves reached as far afield as Russia and Brazil. In a few Southeast Asian countries, political and economic institutions were shaken to their very core and economic progress and poverty reduction were set back by years. Join us for a look back on how these economies fared during the crisis and in the years since. Panelists will ask whether the economic institutions these countries rebuilt or restored will prove capable of managing future economic shocks. This event is co-sponsored by the Johns Hopkins SAIS Asia Programs, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office. Moderator: Vikram Nehru Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence Johns Hopkins SAIS Yasuyuki Sawada Chief Economist Asian Development Bank (ADB) Hoe Ee Khor Chief Economist ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office (AMRO) Sudhir Shetty Chief Economist, East Asia and the Pacific Region The World Bank Markus Rodlauer Deputy Director of the Asia Department International Monetary Fund (IMF)
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SOUTH EAST ASIA 1998 2006

SOUTH EAST ASIA 1998 2006

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  • Duration: 2:17
  • Updated: 30 Apr 2015
  • views: 4
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Thailand - Asia's financial crisis

Thailand - Asia's financial crisis

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  • Duration: 2:19
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 1249
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T/I 10:51:53 About 5,000 Thai government civil servants and bank workers turned up for a one kilometre march through Bangkok's major shopping centre Sunday (11/1) in response to Asia's financial crisis. The financial crisis has spawned a different kind of flea market on Bangkok streets. Second hand luxurious things like Mercedes cars, Rolex watches and designers' clothes, are now found on sale in Bangkok on a much bigger scale. SHOWS: BANGKOK, THAILAND 11/01 High shot of marchers, VS of marchers, marchers waving Thai flags; Man showing US dollar in one hand and 30 Thai bahts in the other (showing the current exchange rate); sign showing the exchange rate; People changing foreign currency for Thai bahts; Man exchanging his money, man receiving a badge for exchanging his money; Child exchanging money; SOT Khunying Supatra Masdit, Minister of the Prime Minister's Office: "We try to convince both Thai and foreigners to save their money in Thai. We are working on the dollar bond right now and we hope that the many Thai who work outside the country will send their money to save in Thailand"; Market of the formely rich: a former stock brokers selling designer T-shirts advertising the market; Expensive watches being sold on the market; CU Rolex watch with price; Used motorbikes for sale; Used Mercedes on sale; Runs: 2.19 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ff9df868d4e605ce074f6d093a12abd9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Thailand_Asia's_Financial_Crisis